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09/20/2016

FALL 2016, ISSUE 1

Teranga Newsletter blog

CIEE Dakar, Senegal - FALL2016

The semester began with passion and the students began to get acquainted; after arriving they went straight to their new homes.  Orientation began so they could become familiar with Senegalese culture and be able to navigate within it.

During orientation they had a Welcome Session, a Meet & Greet one another, and they were given a Program Overview.  A lot of topics were covered so that the students would be well prepared.  Examples are medical, housing, the transportation system, Bystander Intervention, Safety & Security, Internship & Community Service programs, gender and diversity, cultural habits and a downtown sortie.  Cultural pals were invited to help them get a sense of real situations in Senegal.

  CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2016Students with their cultural pals in orientation in the first week. 

CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2016Students trying a type of bus in Dakar to be familiar with how to get from/to their homestay to CIEE. 

CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2016They are getting to know one another who live in the same neighborhood. 

CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2016
Trying out Senegalese eating habits to be prepared during their time with host families. 

CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2016

CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2016Eating their first Senegalese meal using their hands and this is how it works in many of the families where they are staying for the whole semester.

CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2106With their cultural pals and guide they all went to Goree island. Here is on the ferry at sea from the main harbor of Dakar to the island; it takes about 20 minutes to get to Goree. The island of Gorée lies off the coast of Senegal, opposite Dakar. From the 15th to the 19th century, it was the largest slave-trading centre on the African coast. Ruled in succession by the Portuguese, Dutch, English and French, its architecture is characterized by the contrast between the grim slave-quarters and the elegant houses of the slave traders. Today it continues to serve as a reminder of human exploitation and as a sanctuary for reconciliation. CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2106The House of Slaves CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2106Entering the History Museum to learn about the Ile de Goree’s role in Senegalese history.
CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2106 The brightly colored buildings and flowers near the fort. 
CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2106Students experienced Tabaski as well in Senegal and here they have made their own outfits for the event. Tabaski in Senegal. Eid al-Adha is an Islamic festival to commemorate the willingness of Ibrahim (also known as Abraham) to follow Allah's (God's) command to sacrifice his son Ishmael. Muslims around the world observe this event. CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2106 CIEE DAKAR, FALL 2106
Here are what students have said so far about their first few weeks in Senegal:

"I may speak French decently (and it is certainly improving rapidement) but I don’t know Wolof, which is proving to be the more important skill for interactions with people I see on the street or in shops. I have learned that greeting is incredibly important in Senegalese culture, and so I have now dedicated myself to mastering my greeting skills in Wolof, as I may be feeling that I am struggling in first impressions because I have yet to master the many greetings. To be seen whether that makes things feel easier as I go along!"

"On the whole, I have been pushed these first weeks to remain open both to cultural and individual differences I have encountered here and the ways that despite my study of Senegalese culture, this country, or even Dakar, is not a monolith. I don't expect the challenges to stop anytime soon, and I am constantly recreating my idea of what it could feel like, and also may never feel like, to be adjusted to this place while the whole time recognizing that's exactly the kind of tension I came here to investigate."

"I don't know how she did it but Gamo matched me perfectly with my family. But maybe I just say that because I have the best family. I feel really close to them already. My mom came into my room the other day, looked around, and said, "you call this a room? You are messy." She grabbed a broom and started sweeping, murmuring about how my friends were going to come over and talk about how she has a messy daughter."

 

 

 

03/08/2016

SPRING 2016, ISSUE 1

Teranga Newsletter blog

CIEE Dakar, Senegal - SPRING 2016

Spring 2016. Orientation to help students navigate the cultureSpring 2016. Orientation to help students navigate the cultureSpring 2016: downtown sortie to explore the city of DakarSpring 2016: downtown sortie to explore the city of DakarSpring 2016: exploring Dakar's beautifulnessSpring 2016: exploring Dakar's BeautifulnessSpring 2016: exploring Dakar's BeautifulnessSpring 2016: Toubab Dialaw (Retreat moments)Spring 2016: Retreat momentsSpring 2016: Retreat momentsSpring 2016: Retreat momentsSpring 2016: Retreat momentsSpring 2016: Retreat moments
Spring 2016: Culturla learning through cookingSpring 2016: Culturla learning through cookingSpring 2016: Culturla learning through cookingSpring 2016: Culturla learning through cookingSpring 2016: Culturla learning through cookingSpring 2016: Culturla learning through cookingSpring 2016: Culturla learning through cookingSpring 2016: Culturla learning through cookingSpring 2016: Having fun!Spring 2016: Having fun with hostsSpring 2016: Having fun with host familySpring 2016: Going to Goree IslandSpring 2016: Going to Goree IslandSpring 2016: Academic learningSpring 2016: Academic learningSpring 2016: Academic learning
























12/08/2015

FALL 2015, ISSUE 2

Teranga Newsletter blog, CIEE Dakar, Senegal - FALL 2015

  Students take on Senegal 

Students take on Senegal, Fall15

Experiencing Senegalese religious celebration!
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Students with the help of their host families had Senegalese outfits made by local tailors so that they could celebrate Eid.

 Students take on Senegal, Fall15

An agent from ISRA guiding the visit

Students take on Senegal, Fall15

Example of trial plants!
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Field trip to Kedougou to learn about ethnic minorities in Senegal: Kedougou, South East Senegal
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Hiking in the Iwol montain to see a minority group living on top the of the mountain. Children hike 45 mins everyday to go to School down the mountain
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
The beautiful "Dindefello" water falls
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Iwol village on top of the mountain: Bedik minority group
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Enjoy the view of the landscape!
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Niokolo Koba: The national zoo
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Community Engagement: Helping a school in their project of having a new building.
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Kids from the school enjoying working side by side with CIEE students
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Cleaning up and trash picking up before painting the school!

Students take on Senegal, Fall15

Students take on Senegal, Fall15
BADED is a CIEE partner for students internships.
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Finishing the day and saying goodbye. The kids were very happy for the day!

 Students take on Senegal, Fall15

Senegalese food !

Students take on Senegal, Fall15

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Rural visits: Students spent one week in rural areas throughout Senegal to explore village life compare to city life

 

Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Senegalese islam class visited three differente brotherhoods to learn more about them. The professor explaining the history of Mouridism and Touba (the religious city)
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Visiting another brotherhood an hour drive from Dakar
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
Listening to the history of the formation of this brotherhood as well as its city
Students take on Senegal, Fall15
More exploring and learning! A different brotherhood













 

09/21/2015

FALL 2015, ISSUE 1

  Teranga Newsletter blog, CIEE Dakar, Senegal

FALL 2015

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING 

 

The best way to learn about a culture is by immersion into that culture. CIEE Dakar offers theopportunity to students to do that by providing many possibilities for exploring the country and its culture.  For example:  

Fall 2015: Experiential Learning

Learning about eating habits in Sengal through their cultural pals before trying them at their homestays;

Fall 2015: Experiential learning

Having their first taste of the Senegalese national dish of Wolof rice and fish called Ceebu jën;

Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experential learning

Enjoying the mango season during Orientation and Culture in context day;

Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experential learningBecoming familiar with their respective host families areas by doing a neighborhood sortie with their cultural guides;

Fall 2015: Experential learning Fall 2015: Experential learning Fall 2015: Experential learning

Fully integrating into the culture by spending time with host families.  Students are given this opportunity by being assigned to host families which they are part of for the entire semester; 

Fall 2015: Experential learning Fall 2015: Experential learning Fall 2015: Experential learning

Exchanging visits with each other to experience a different family or neighborhood;  

Fall 2015: Experential learning

Touring and exploring the city of Dakar to learn how to get around. Guided by their cultural pals, students visit many landmarks and famous places in the city of Dakar.

Fall 2015: Experential learning Fall 2015: Experiential learning

Students experiential public transportation they will be using for the rest of the semester in Dakar;  

Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experiential learning

Visiting Goree island, the historical slavery land where thousands of human beings passed through the door with no return to be shipped to Americas. Goree, a World Heritage;

Fall 2015: Experiential learning
Fall 2015: Experiential learning
Unesco World Heritage Fall 2015: Experiential learningLunch at Goree:  Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experiential learning

The first excursion of the semester: Toubab Dialaw, outside of Dakar. After few weeks of academic learning we took a weekend trip to a little fishing village situated 55 km from Dakar on the Atlantic coast, with beaches of beautiful white sand and rock formations;

Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experiential learning

Students were able to choose between doing batik (tie dying), or dance or  drumming.

Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experiential learning
Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experiential learning Fall 2015: Experiential learning






 






















 

04/30/2015

SPRING 2015, ISSUE 2

Teranga Newsletter blog, CIEE Dakar, Senegal

SPRING 2015

EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING

EXCURSIONS

At Sobo Badè students took classes in batik, African dance, or drumming. EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNINGEXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING

EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING

Exploring the weekend trip to Toubab Dialaw, a seaside resort that is located about 50 km (or 31 miles) southeast of DakarEXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNINGThe latest cultural excursion that was carried not long ago; is an integral and important section of the program that students greatly appreciate.EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING
We visited Mar Lodj, one of the islands of the unpolluted wonderfully quiet setting of the saloum delta region.
EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNINGAfter a delicious lunch with one of Senegalese national dish, we took a pirogue (boat) tour of the mangoves!
EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNINGThe next day we took the horse carts for a tour of the villages within the island of Mar Lodj.
EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNINGVisiting the church of the village in Mar Lodaj: This part of the country we have christians and muslims living together and no one can tell who is christian or muslim.
EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING
The village organized a traditional wrestling competition from the ethnic group of the area to show us an aspect of the Senegalese culture.
EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNINGThe big baobab tree of the village full of history of the ancestors EXPLORING, LIVING & LEARNING














 

 

 

 

 

11/11/2014

FALL 2014, ISSUE 2

Teranga Newsletter blog - CIEE Study Center, Dakar Senegal

I - Highlights of Students’ involvement in their Internships and community engagement.

A large portion of the Dakar CIEE program consists of internships, volunteering and community engagement. Students are involved with this experiential work throughout their semester in Dakar. The Internship Coordinator in charge of placing students at a large variety of organizations and institutions. Students typically visit their placement sites once or twice per week.

Intership and Community Engagement, Fall 14 Internship and Community Engagement, Fall 14Some students for their community engagement volunteer at a pottery school for kids with disabilities called Colombin. They painted a mural with the students to make the space enjoyable and easy to work at.
Internship and Community Engagement, Fall 14 Internship and Community Engagement, Fall 14Here at Colombin, CIEE students improve the students and staff morale and effectiveness where they intern by bringing energy and reducing the workload and espacially helping the association grow.

Internship and Community Engagement, Fall 14 Internship and Community Engagement, Fall 14 Internship and Community Engagement, Fall 14A student said this: “I volunteer at an amazing place called Colombin, a pottery school for kids with disabilities. This week we painted a mural. It was sooo fun and I can't express how blessed I am to get to work with such wonderful people (CIEE students and Senegalese folks alike!!)”

Internship and Community Engagement, Fall 14 Internship and Community Engagement, Fall 14

Students visiting schools with their intership institution but also some class field trips. Students provide new ideas, creativity, and warmth to the institutions they intern. They not only impact the children like in this picture but the staff also learns a lot from them.


A student said this: "Our Education and Culture class came to visit the school and hear Monsieur Mbaye-Amoul yakar's story."
Internship and community Engagement, Fall 14 Internship and Community Engagement, Fall 14A word from a student: "We went to visit an elementary school. It kind of made me sad seeing as how some classrooms don't have books and some don't even have teachers. The students will just sit around all day. But one highlight was that they bum rushed me and the other students who came like we were celebrities or something. It made me happy that they were so excited to meet Americans."

Internship and Community Engagement, Fall 14

II - STUDENTS' IMMERSION INTO THE CULTURE

Besides the academic life that students experience in classrooms to acquire new knowledge, they also totally immerse themselves into the Senegalese cultural and everyday life in Dakar and within their host families.

STUDENTS' IMMERSION INTO THE CULTURE STUDENTS' IMMERSION INTO THE CULTURE STUDENTS' IMMERSION INTO THE CULTURE STUDENTS' IMMERSION INTO THE CULTURE
When there is a party or celebration organized by host families, cultural pals, friends or who else that can enhance students' learning curiosity and gain a deeper understanding of the culture, CIEE encourages students to get involved. A perfect example is when Muslims celebrated the Eid, many of the students made an outfit and mingled in the community to celebrate like and with them.
STUDENTS' IMMERSION INTO THE CULTURE STUDENTS' IMMERSION INTO THE CULTURE

During the third day of qualification of the soccer game for African Cup of Nations (CAN) , students were not left out. They did not want to stay home to watch it on television. They had nothing to worry about because CIEE with the help of cultural pals organized a ride to the stadium to enable students to experience these moments live. STUDENTS' IMMERSION INTO THE CULTURE STUDENTS' IMMERSION INTO THE CULTURE STUDENTS' IMMERSION INTO THE CULTURE STUDENTS' IMMERSION INTO THE CULTUREIII - FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Language teachers

To enable students to have a good semester and be able to learn with ease, the academic coordinator organized a workshop session for faculty development to better help students meet their academic needs. FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Language teachers The workshop took place on October 29th and was a forum of exchanges between Language Teachers in one hand, and all CIEE trainers in the other hand. The objective of the workshop was to improve the quality of teaching at CIEE, mainly in French classes where lessons need to focus more on students’ needs; but also with a Faculty to be able to understand and manage problems/ misunderstandings related to culture that often happen in classes.

FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Language teachers

A) During the first session (particularly organized for Language teachers), the followings points were discussed:

*Lessons covered in French classes for the 4 levels (lessons’ plans /contents/activities)

*New activities to reinforce the practice in class and work on grammar, conjugation, vocabulary acquisition and memorization, questioning as well as students’ spontaneity, etc.

FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Language teachersB) The second session organized for all teachers was about problems (mainly those related to culture) they faced in their classes.

After a deep discussion, some recommendations were given to teachers as strategies to better manage misunderstandings in class.

IV - OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits

Two weeks ago, the Language & Culture (LC) and Development Studies (DS) programs students spent one week for LC students and two weeks for DS students in rural areas throughout Senegal to experience rural life and to expose themselves into real Senegalese culture. Some of them went to rural areas with a Peace Corps volunteer where there is no electricity; there were off with no technology (no electronic devices, no wifi), some of them couldn't even charge their phones. OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits

OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural VisitsA student said this: “I spent the most incredible week being hosted by Jill, a Peace Corps volunteer living in Agnam Toungel, a village in the Podor region, way up North in Senegal. More impressive even than Jill's Pular speaking skills was her seamless integration into the culture and community.”
OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits
OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits
“I traveled to Thies for my rural visit in Keur Demba. I asked for electricity so Victoria placed me with a family that actually had a television. The bathroom was bigger than the one I had here in Dakar. My room was more spacious too and I was surprised because I thought that my living situation would be a little worse than here in Dakar. I suppose some people did have a worse living situation than I did. When I arrived, everyone was excited to meet me. They gave me a new name (Ndiya Wade: I don't know how to spell it) and they constantly quizzed me on the names of my host mom and dad. They mainly spoke Wolof and very little French. It was difficult for me to communicate with my family especially since my Wolof isn't very good. They asked me what I liked to eat and they made it for me for dinner. There wasn't very much to do. It was definitely a time to relax and enjoy your surroundings. I did help shell some beans that they would cook for dinner. One day, a student and I got to ride on the back of the horse when we traveled to into the fields to gather food for the other horses. It was really beautiful seeing the trees and feeding the horse was fun! I didn't know that they had such strong jaws. One of the days there, I had to take my first bucket shower, but it wasn't that bad. Apparently the water stopped working in the community. On a different day, we were able to see the women in the community tie dye clothing that they would later sale to the community. I purchased a blue wrap. Overall, it was a great experience and it gave me a greater appreciation for the things we have here in Dakar as well as America”.

OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits
“This past week on the rural visit was an unforgettable experience. I was able to integrate into rural life quickly and participate in an array of activities. From Senegalese wrestling to harvesting peanuts to riding horses and donkeys to searching water from a well and carrying on my head to teaching an elementary class in French - my rural visit was enriching. It was remarkable to see the work ethic of these incredible men and women. They are focused on the essentials of life and it was a breath of fresh air to reconnect with nature and traditional ways of living.”

OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits
OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits OUTSITE STUDENTS TECHNOLOGY BUBBLE: Rural Visits






















 

 

 




 

 

 

 

09/02/2014

FALL 2014, ISSUE 1

Teranga Newsletter from CIEE Study Center, Dakar Senegal

First step: An orientation to how to navigate oneself into senegalese daily life.

To begin their four months in Senegal, students took a week to get a taste of Senegalese culture. This orientation allows them to begin their semester with ease.

Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in SenegalStudents were welcomed by staff members at the CIEE Study Center. They then participated in a comprehensive orientation program that aimed to prepare them for the upcoming semester. Throughout the week, they learned about cultural customs, proper dining etiquette, and Senegalese values as well as many logistics pertaining to living in Dakar.

Fall 2014, Orienation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in SenegalThe orientation kicked off with an overview of the cultural and academic program to enable students to get a glimpse of what to expect throughout the semester. After that a physician from SOS Medecin, our designated team of program doctors, came to talk with students about how best to prevent, identify, and treat anything from diarrhea to malaria. The doctor fielded all their questions.

Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in SenegalIn order to place students in classes based on their level of French, a language placement test was held on the first afternoon of orientation. There was a written test conducted by French Professors. After that CIEE staff members administered an oral LPI (Language Proficiency Interview).

Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in SenegalStudents went to the Baobab center (ACI) to have a cross cultural orientation and they learned how to eat around the bowl with their hands, which is a common way of eating in Senegal. There are many rules for eating, such as only eating with one’s right hand and only eating within your allotted pie piece. Then students put their learning into use when eating their first meal around the bowl.
Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in SenegalAn interactive session on transportation was conducted so that students could get acquainted with the system of buses and taxis in Dakar. During this session they were also introduced to local markets and to the art of bargaining.
Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in SenegalTrying out car rapids, bus transportation in Dakar. Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in SenegalWeek one of orientation concluded with a downtown sortie with the Cultural Pals. Cultural Pals are Senegalese students recruited to help students navigate Senegalese culture, Dakar, and Senegal at large. They are students’ cultural references for any issues or questions they may encounter.

Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in SenegalThe next day it was time for the presentation of internship and community services programs. The resident coordinator presented the organizations where students conduct their internships throughout the semester. According to student interest, the coordinator discussed with students the possibilities available to them. Nearly every student received a community service or internship placement.

Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in SenegalAfter the neighborhood sortie that familiarized students with their respective neighborhoods, students took their first Survival Wolof course. This first class covered greeting etiquette, which is very important in Senegalese culture.

Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal

Fall 2014, Orienation to navigate in Senegal 

 

 After two Survival Wolof courses students were  prepared to interact with their family (at least to  greeting and to communicate their basic needs). It  is very helpful for students to start using Wolof  because it is a good tool to get comfortable with  their family members.

The orientation also included sessions on safety and security, gender and diversity, and living with homestay families.

 


Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in SenegalA very important element of this orientation was the session on cultural objects which allowed students to learn lot about the culture and customs of the Senegalese. Through this activity, they were able to learn some important things which will help to prevent many mistakes and missteps. With the assistance of cultural pals, students organized themselves into small groups and they went out with one or more cultural objects to ask questions to people they meet on the street at random. Their responses collected were used in the larger group to share with everyone so that they all benefit from it.
Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal

Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal Fall 2014, Orientation to navigate in Senegal











 

 

 





04/02/2014

SPRING 2014, ISSUE 2

 

 

 

Teranga Newsletter from CIEE Study Center, Dakar Senegal

Internships and Community Engagement

As usual, for-credit internships and not-for-credit community service opportunities play a significant part in the CIEE Dakar student experience. In terms of for-credit internships, 16 students in the Development Studies program and 7 students in the Language and Culture program have been placed in 16 different organizations in Dakar. The placements are in Government agencies such as “Stratégie de Croissance Accélérée” and in non-governmental organizations such as RADDHO and Siggil Jiggen as well as in public institutions such as the Albert Royer children’s hospital.

Continue reading "SPRING 2014, ISSUE 2" »

02/03/2014

SPRING 2014, ISSUE 1

Teranga Newsletter from Dakar, Senegal

SPRING 2014 has started

The CIEE Dakar SP14 students arrived on January 19, 2014 and were welcomed by staff members. They then participated in a comprehensive orientation program that aimed to prepare them for the upcoming semester. Throughout the week, they learned about cultural customs, proper dining etiquette, and Senegalese values as well as many logistics pertaining to living in Dakar.

Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal
 

The students also had the opportunity to showcase their acting abilities when role-playing security incidents that happened to previous CIEE students.  Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

  Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

On day one there was a welcome session, which included introductions as well as an overview of the academic program. After an appetizing lunch of a Senegalese dish, the orientation continued with an informative and interactive medical session. After that, a French placement exam was carried out in order to adequately assess students’ levels.

  Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

On the second day of orientation, the CIEE students attended a cross cultural orientation led by the NGO ACI (Africa Consultants International). This day-long session addressed many issues that students should be aware of when living with Senegalese host families. They discussed Senegal as a whole at first, and then sang a song called “Tank, loko, nopp, bakan, baat, bet,and gemin” (Wolof: Legs, hands, ears, nose, throat, eyes and lips). The students were then split into groups to talk about values, beliefs, and assumptions.

Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal
Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

They also learned how to eat around the bowl with their hands, which is a common way of eating in Senegal. There are many rules for eating, such as only eating with one’s right hand and only eating within your allotted pie piece. Then students put their learning into use when eating their first meal around the bowl. After lunch, they finished their presentations and walked back to the CIEE study center.

  Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

That evening, CIEE staff members held sessions on transportation and shopping.  According to many students, these sessions were very informative.

  Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

Survival Wolof lessions began the next day. These classes provided students with certain expressions that were useful during their first days with their families. On Wednesday afternoon, the students joined their host families.

Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

 On Thursday the students attended a presentation on internship and community service and then had survival Wolof again before the gender and diversity session. CIEE shares a building with a Senegalese social science university. The partnership goes beyond sharing a physical space; CIEE students partner with local students in order to practice their language skills and to exchange lessons about culture.

Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

On Friday, CIEE staff members led a homestay debriefing to address  students’ questions and concerns. The final orientation session involved asking students to go out on the street and ask questions about cultural objects that they were given. The students returned after about an hour to share information they gathered with the group. The activity was an enjoyable and interactive way to wrap up the week’s activities. On Saturday, the students had a downtown excursion that gave them the opportunity to visit the city and have lunch on their own.

 

  Spring 2014 - CIEE Senegal

  Students in Goree island

 

11/27/2013

FALL 2013, ISSUE VI

CIEE Teranga Newsletter

Dakar, Senegal

Visiting Saint Louis Region in the Northwest of Senegal

Last weekend CIEE group took a break from classes in Dakar. The group traveled to Northern Senegal to explore another aspect of the country and its culture. We left Dakar in the morning and traveled east to Thies, where we stopped for lunch. Thies, the second Region of the country, is also known as the capital of the railways. After the delicious lunch we headed to the Lompoul Desert, the Djoudj National Park and Saint Louis fo Senegal.

Visiting Saint Louis Region in the Northwest of Senegal Lompoul Desert Djoudj National Bird Park Faidherbe Bridge is a road bridge over the Sénégal River which links the island of the city of Saint-Louis in Senegal to the African mainland. The metal bridge is 507.35 metres long and 10.5 metres wide, weighing 1,500 tonnes
Lompoul desert

After a great lunch in Thies, the group headed to the Lompoul desert. After everyone settled down in their assigned tents, students the rest of the afternoon students were free to explore the around the desert and had the option of taking a short fifteen-minute camel ride. At sunset everyone gathered in the meal tent and experienced a caravan trail meal. After dinner, a tam-tam party was offered to our group by our host. For hours into the night the tam-tam music provided a wonderful time for dancing and enjoying each other’s company. Everyone had a wonderful time.

Lompoul Desert Lompoul Desert Lompoul DesertLompoul

The Lompoul desert (sometimes spelled Lumpoul; in Frenchdésert de Lompoul) is a small desert (about 18 km2) located 145 km south of Saint-Louis, Senegal. The landscape is formed by deep brown and orange sand dunes; this type of dune is more akin to those of the Sahara and Mauritania desert than those of the surrounding area of Senegal (the Grande-Côte), which gives students a more varied experience of Senegal. The desert is named after the closest settlement, the village of Lompoul.

Lomoul Desert Lompoul DesertDjoudj National Bird Park

After our wonderful afternoon and evening in the desert, the next morning we got up very early to have breakfast and head out to Djoudj National Bird Park.  This bird sanctuary is famous as the favorite site of European birds that travel south to this specific location in Senegal each year to escape the cold northern winters. We arrived at Djoudj around lunch time. The students were placed in two “pirogues” (a large wooden canoe) to travel along the river to spot and observe the various types of migratory birds.

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Mout

Djoudj

The Djoudj National Bird Sanctuary (FrenchParc national des oiseaux du Djoudj) lies on the southeast bank of the River Senegal, in northern Biffeche, northeast of the city of Saint Louis.

Canard

The sanctuary provides a range of wetland habitats perfect for the needs of migrating birds, many of which have just crossed the Sahara Desert. The winter home for almost 400 species of birds, the most abundant and visible are the pelicans and the flamingos.

Aquatic Warbler

Less conspicuous are the Aquatic Warblers; for this particular species of bird, the park is the single most important wintering site yet discovered.

Djouddd

In addition to birds, a wide range of wildlife like wild boars, crocodiles and monkeys among others also inhabit the park. Due to the parks importance to birds and wildlife alike, it has been designated a World Heritage Site.

Djod

Visiting Saint Louis

After a delicious lunch at the Djoudj Hotel (hotel de Djoudj) the group set out for the city of Saint Louis- first established in 1659 as a French trading post.  We arrived at our hotel, Rogniat Nord. First we distributed room keys so that students could settle in and place their bags. After they were settled, together we all headed to the restaurant for a delicious dinner. Students choose from a variety of authentic local and international cuisine that could accommodate everyone’s tastes including fish, lamb, shrimp, pasta and vegetarian options. After dinner, students decided to explore the island in small groups. Some students chose to observe the local small scale cafe scene to listen to varied Jazz acts, while others preferred attending a live music concert at a larger hotel bar. Still other students chose to simply walk around the city to observe the night life and chat with locals and street vendors.

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Saint Louis Bridge

Since Saint Louis lies on the border of Senegal and Mauritania (the Senegal River serving as the international boarder) students were eager to observe Senegal’s neighbor to the North.  The next morning, students were given the chance to make a quick visit to the border so that they could “see” Mauritania. After this short excursion, most students used the early morning to complete some shopping in the neat boutiques and artist shops. The rest of the students used this time to explore a little more of the city and in particular its historical architecture- since many of the colonial buildings from when Saint Louis was the French capital of French West Africa still stand. After these early morning activities the group gathered for lunch and after another wonderful meal we boarded the buses for the return trip back to Dakar.

Saint Pont

Saint Louis

Founded as a French colonial settlement in the 17th century, Saint Louis was urbanized in the mid-19th century. It was the capital of Senegal from 1872 to 1957 and played an important cultural and economic role in the whole of West Africa. The location of the town on an island at the mouth of the Senegal River, the system of quays, and the colonial architecture give Saint-Louis a distinctive appearance and unique identity in Senegal.

SLoi

Saint

Saint-Louis was established in 1659 by French traders on an uninhabited island called Ndar. It was baptized Saint-Louis-du-Fort in homage to the French king Louis XIV. It was the first permanent French settlement in Senegal. The fortified trading post allowed the French to conduct business with African traders who traveled from the interior to the coast along the Senegal River. Slaves, hides, beeswax, ambergris and, later, gum arabic were the main items of trade. In 1758, during the Seven Years War, British forces captured Senegal. The British controlled the port for 21 years until February of 1779, when French forces recaptured Saint-Louis. In the late 18th century, Saint-Louis became the leading urban center in sub-Saharan. During that time, the island was home to approximately 5,000 inhabitants, although this number does not count the slaves held and waiting to be exported to the Americas through the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade.  Today, trade continues to be a critical element of Saint-Louis’ economy, but tourism constitutes this city’s most important economic contribution. For this reason, the city preserves and celebrates its Atlantic World heritage, like many other cities throughout the world with similar “Creole Atlantic” roots including Bahia in Brazil, Havana in Cuba and New Orleans in the United States.

SALAIAN

 

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